Save Your Favorite Images and Media on WordPress.com, Anytime

New feature for WordPress.

The WordPress.com Blog

We’ve added a new media section to your WordPress.com dashboard, allowing you to bulk upload, edit, and tweak your media files. Let’s look at the changes:

Upload Media in Bulk

Add new items in bulk by going to MediaAdd New to activate the file picker. You can also drag and drop items right onto the page.

Edit Media

Now you can edit media files as you add them to your post or directly from the media section. To modify media information like the title or caption, select the items you would like to edit, then click Edit.

In the details view, you can update the title, caption, and description. Any changes made in these fields will be saved automatically for you.

Edit Photos

If you have a photo that needs to be cropped or rotated you can now update this here, too! From the media detail view…

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Writing Advice from Raymond Chandler

Raymond Chandler

the psychopathology of everyday life – Adrian McKinty’s blog: Writing Advice From Raymond Chandler

“A long time ago when I was writing for pulps I put into a story a line like “he got out of the car and walked across the sun-drenched sidewalk until the shadow of the awning over the entrance fell across his face like the touch of cool water.”  They took it out when they published the story.  Their readers didn’t appreciate this sort of thing: just held up the action.  And I set out to prove them wrong.  My theory was they just thought they cared nothing about anything but the action; that really, although they didn’t know it, they cared very little about the action.  The things they really cared about, and that I cared about, were the creation of emotion through dialogue and description; the things they remembered, that haunted them, were not for example that a man got killed, but that in the moment of his death he was trying to pick a paper clip up off the polished surface of a desk, and it kept slipping away from him, so that there was a look of strain on his face and his mouth was half open in a kind of tormented grin, and the last thing in the world he thought about was death.  He didn’t even hear death knock on the door.  That damn little paper clip kept slipping away from his fingers and he just wouldn’t push it to the edge of the desk and catch it as it fell.”

Using my Magnum voice

The long process of story and rewrite as only Phill Barron could tell.

The Jobbing Scriptwriter

One of the problems with writing a film script is the length of time it takes to write/produce versus the length of time it takes to read/watch.*

A script of 110 pages may take an hour/hour and a half to read# but it probably took the best part of a year to write from spark of conception to final draft. Sometimes longer. I have a script due to go into production which began life in 2009 or maybe even 2008. The first six months was an intense period of rewriting and thrashing things out. Everything since then has been periodic rewrites to accommodate various cast members as they get attached or to please an array of investors/producers/whims as they appear and disappear.

Coming back to a script after a couple of years of not thinking about it is an enlightening and terrifying experience.

“Why did I think that

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25 Ways To Raise The Stakes In Your Script Writing You Need To Know

Gideon's Screenwriting Tips: Now You're a Screenwriter

The screenwriting journey for both your main characters and your audience should be filled with twists and turns; ups and downs.

Screenwriters are taught to raise the stakes for their characters to create excitement, tension, intrigue and anxiety. This is more than simply putting multiple obstacles in the path of the main characters in your screenplay to stop them achieving their goals. There must be serious consequences for failure.

Stakes explore the POTENTIAL for things to go wrong for your main characters. Stakes must be substantial, not merely an inconvenience. They literally should be a matter of life and death.

Writers must explain how not achieving their goals will affect the characters, not only physically, but emotionally and spiritually too. It needs to be deeply personal.

Let’s look at some ways to raise the stakes for your main characters by examining the repercussions if they fail:

  1. They lose the respect of…

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Author, Don’t Be Shy

author header without book information
 author header without book information

You Want Readers. Tell Them About Your Books.

When readers see your header on your website or on social media like Facebook, Twitter, Google+, or anywhere else, do they know your genre right away? If you don’t tell them, they won’t know. They’re not going to scroll down your page or your social media posts to try to discover the type of story you tell. More importantly, you are missing potential readers by hiding that information. Even a header with book covers may mislead them. Tell them right up front. Romantic fantasy. Horror. Thriller. Entice new readers with a straightforward tip on your genre.

Take a look at the image above. Are you ready to read Miranda’s books?

I’m a member of several author groups. Recently in two groups, there was a call to post Facebook pages and websites. I was astounded at how many headers told me nothing about the books. I had to dig around–these were fellow group members–to discover the genre or look for books by the author. Their headers were as mysterious as the one above.

Your Name, Author. Won’t get you readers.

Your responsibility as an author is to let readers know what you write.  Appeal to readers who resonate with your story elements. Your Name, Author, may be an ego boost but does not invite your core readers to find out more or buy your books.

Simple Promotion

Adding a bit more for your readers will help new readers discover you and lead to more book sales.

  • Your Name
  • Your Genre – A tagline.
  • Where to buy your books

Adding your genre and where to buy your books directs the right readers to your books. Big name authors often have just their name in the header, but indie authors need to work just a bit harder.

Graphic designers don’t always know about marketing. If you hire someone to create your header give them explicit direction and the actual words you need on your header.

If your budget is limited, Canva provides simple, easy to use templates or you can create your own from scratch. I used a simple template to create the image for this article.

Robust Author Promotion

Your header is the first visual people encounter when they reach your website or social media site. Give potential readers the basics. You want readers who love your genre. They will be happy to discover a new author if you give them the right clues.

However much you prefer writing to building your author platform, give the platform a boost with simple cues for your reader audience.

Zara Altair

Zara Altair writes mysteries set in ancient Italy. Argolicus thinks he has retired, but he and his tutor, Nikolaos are drawn into puzzles, politics, and murder.
She consults with a select group of writers as The Story Bodyguard.d

Emotions first

The Jobbing Scriptwriter

emotions_2c18b4_208007

I have a nasty tendency when I’m plotting out a script to get too focused on the events. I work out what the beginning and end scenes are and then split the story into quarters, give each quarter a rough title and then start fleshing each quarter out with scenes.

The problem with this approach is it can sometimes leave me with cool sequences I’m very attached to which look great … but don’t really service the character’s journey. Because that’s what a film is: the protagonist’s journey, following along as they learn their most important, life changing lesson.

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No matter how big or blockbuster-y the film is, I want that emotional core. I want it to the story of one person learning and changing and growing (or dying and failing, that works too) … and I want that journey to be integral to the story. I don’t want the…

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Opening Lines – Dead Gone

Opening lines that grab.

The Irresponsible Reader

Head & Shoulders used to tell us that, “You never get a second chance to make a first impression.” That’s true for wearing dark shirts, and it’s especially true for books. Sometimes the characters will hook the reader, sometimes the premise, sometimes it’s just knowing the author — but nothing beats a great opening for getting a reader to commit. This is one of the better openings I’ve read recently. Would it make you commit?

She hadn’t been afraid of the dark.

Not before.

Not before it entered her life without her knowing, enveloping her like a second skin, becoming a part of her.

She hadn’t been claustrophobic, petrified the walls were closing in around her. Crushed to death without knowing they’d even moved. Not scared of things that crawled around her toes. Wasn’t afraid to sit alone in a darkened room and wonder if something was touching her face…

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